High cholesterol ‘does not cause heart disease’ new research finds, so treating with statins a ‘waste of time’

The Telegraph

ByHenry Bodkin
13 JUNE 2016 • 1:01AM
Cholesterol does not cause heart disease in the elderly and trying to reduce it with drugs like statins is a waste of time, an international group of experts has claimed.

A review of research involving nearly 70,000 people found there was no link between what has traditionally been considered “bad” cholesterol and the premature deaths of over 60-year-olds from cardiovascular disease.

Published in the BMJ Open journal, the new study found that 92 percent of people with a high cholesterol level lived longer.

The authors have called for a re-evaluation of the guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of the arteries, because “the benefits from statin treatment have been exaggerated”.

The results have prompted immediate scepticism from other academics, however, who questioned the paper’s balance.

High cholesterol is commonly caused by an unhealthy diet, and eating high levels of saturated fat in particular, as well as smoking.

It is carried in the blood attached to proteins called lipoproteins and has been traditionally linked to cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease and aortic disease.

Co-author of the study Dr Malcolm Kendrick, an intermediate care GP, acknowledged the findings would cause controversy but defended them as “robust” and “thoroughly reviewed”.

“What we found in our detailed systematic review was that older people with high LDL (low-density lipoprotein) levels, the so-called “bad” cholesterol, lived longer and had less heart disease.”

Vascular and endovascular surgery expert Professor Sherif Sultan from the University of Ireland, who also worked on the study, said cholesterol is one of the “most vital” molecules in the body and prevents infection, cancer, muscle pain and other conditions in elderly people.

“Lowering cholesterol with medications for primary cardiovascular prevention in those aged over 60 is a total waste of time and resources, whereas altering your lifestyle is the single most important way to achieve a good quality of life,” he said.

Lead author Dr Uffe Ravnskov, a former associate professor of renal medicine at Lund University in Sweden, said there was “no reason” to lower high-LDL-cholesterol.

But Professor Colin Baigent, an epidemiologist at Oxford University, said the new study had “serious weaknesses and, as a consequence, has reached completely the wrong conclusion”.

Another skeptic, consultant cardiologist Dr Tim Chico, said he would be more convinced by randomised study where some patients have their cholesterol lowered using a drug, such as a stain, while others receive a placebo.

He said: “There have been several studies that tested whether higher cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol in elderly patients and observing whether this reduces their risk of heart disease.

“These have shown that lowering cholesterol using a drug does reduce the risk of heart disease in the elderly, and I find this more compelling than the data in the current study.”

The British Heart Foundation also questioned the new research, pointing out that the link between high LDL cholesterol levels and death in the elderly is harder to detect because, as people get older, more factors determine overall health.

“There is nothing in the current paper to support the author’s suggestions that the studies they reviewed cast doubt on the idea that LDL Cholesterol is a major cause of heart disease or that guidelines on LDL reduction in the elderly need re-valuating,” a spokesman said.



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'High cholesterol ‘does not cause heart disease’ new research finds, so treating with statins a ‘waste of time’' have 2 comments

  1. June 14, 2016 @ 5:45 pm Frankly

    I lost a good friend who was taking statins…heart attack.73 yrs old. I tried to convince him not to take them, but I wasn’t a Dr….damnitol!..folks are so suseptible to deception jus cause’ the ptb says so..never question authority,boy…I have a friend in vegas who did harvoni..1,ooo.oo per/dose per day x12 weeks…he is now cleared…I wonder what long term affects await him and others who use this treatment? Probably gonna be like statins….only worse…I shudder to think of what that poison is doing…hell I would rather use mms….I know what it does…

    Reply

  2. June 17, 2016 @ 5:51 pm Bill Murphy

    My doctor put me on Lipator to lower my ldl’s. After about a year, my memory was serious impared. I stopped taking Lipator against the my doctors advice.

    Its been approxiamently two and one half years since I went off my med and I feel a hole lot better. Some of my memory has increased, but not all of it.

    Allso to improve my health and memory, about one year ago I started to walk 10 km a day and eat less mear and more vegetables andy. I feel great, most of my memory has improve and I have lost about 25 lbs.

    Reply


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