Earth Is a 24-Hour Clock

 

 

By Atom Bergstrom

Atom’s Blog

Re: Well, a huge change has happened for me and I’ve moved from Portland, OR USA to Melbourne, Australia. Now that I’m living here in Melbourne I’m not sure when the “zones” take place during the day. For instance, it states that Zone 1 is from 12am-12pm, Zone 2 is 12pm-6pm, and Zone 3 is 6pm-12am and I’m assuming this is for people living in USA, then what time would the zones be for people living in Melbourne, Australia?

Those times work for everywhere in the world.

They’re based on our planet’s axis of rotation — Earth rotates once every 24 hours with respect to the Sun.

Follow Melbourne Standard Time throughout the year (like we followed Keri-Keri Time when we stayed in New Zealand for three months).

Solar Time synchronizes you to the local environment wherever you live or travel.

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Re: Okay fantastic, that’s great to know! I was also wondering about your opinions on circadian eating, basically only eating when the sun is out, stop eating after sunset, breakfast as sunrise? During the winter months the sun sets at 5pm and I worry if it’s not good to eat when it’s dark out. Or do you think by following the chronobiotic schedule of eating whenever as long as the food is on time is the most beneficial?

The circadian clock is primary, and the light clock (light-induced phase shifting) is secondary.

The human mouth functions 24 hours a day.

If the light clock were primary, modern civilization would be in serious trouble because it takes an entire week of outdoor camping to synchronize it.

Ideally, both clocks are synchronized, but that’s rarely true in First World countries.

Fortunately, we have other options, and the food clock (Solar Nutrition) is the easiest.

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The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the light center of the hypothalamus.

It’s a light-entrained internal oscillator and central control center of circadian rhythms.

The SCN’s two nuclei are receptive to light cues, and prolonged exposure to light can compromise the SCN’s circadian timekeeping.

The SCN is the most thoroughly researched of the three central pacemaking centers of the brain.

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The ventromedial nucleus (VMN) is the “satiety center” of the hypothalamus, a food-entrained internal oscillator and major control center of circadian rhythms.

The VMN’s two nuclei are receptive to FOOD CUES, especially after food restriction.

Fasting can reset the body’s circadian rhythms, and shift some of the timekeeping responsibilities from the SCN and the LGN to the VMN.

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The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is the “negative-light center” of the hypothalamus, a darkness-entrained internal oscillator and major control center of circadian rhythms.

The LGN’s two nuclei are receptive to darkness cues.

The LGN is one of the three central pacemaking centers of the brain, especially its intergeniculate leaflet (IGL).

Plant growth and reproduction are almost exclusively controlled by darkness cue, not light cues.

It’s not mainstream science, but humans are too.

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Adano Ley referred to the …

SCN as the Way of the Tourist

VMN as the Way of the Gourmet (Butterfly Technique)

LGN as the Way of the Meditator.

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Re: I’m amazed to see that it would be okay to eat things like fruit or chocolate even at 3am? Would love to know you opinion on this.

The Theobroma cacao tree grows up to 30 feet tall, so cocoa and chocolate are definitely Growth Zone 1 foods.

However, human beings probably do best by eating most of their food at …

Stomach Time (7:00-9:00 a.m.)

Small Intestine Time (1:00-3:00 p.m.)

Circulation-Sex Time (7:00-9:00 p.m.)

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Re: As you mentioned many times, during your study with Adano, he never slept, so he must’ve been eating really late at night too?

Adano had an occasional snack or late meal, especially when we were “On the Road.”

Often said snack would be for “therapy,” like eating pistachios at Lung Time (3:00-5:00 a.m.) to reduce the glare of headlights.

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According to Greg Whiteley …

“It’s good to be well-balanced on a round planet.”
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'Earth Is a 24-Hour Clock' have 4 comments

  1. July 19, 2019 @ 2:01 pm Atom

    We don’t use red light for therapy at night (only for circadian prophylaxis) —>

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYS0EeaAUMw

    Reply

  2. July 19, 2019 @ 3:35 pm Atom

    Sugar fights cancer. Otto Warburg criticized lactic acid, not sugar, but he’s perpetually misquoted.

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    Sugar, fat, and salt are Big Pharma’s enemies.

    Big Pharma marketers are itching to sell us impressively-named beaker boy supplements like AMPK Metabolic Activator, N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine, Optimized Ashwagandha Extract, Endothelial Plaque Stabilizer, Bio-Enhanced R-Lipoic Acid, High-Potency Optimized Folate, Magnesium L-Threonate, Advanced Bio-Quercitin-Theoflavin Formula, Lactobacillus Plantarum Strain L-137, Streptococcus Salivarius M18, Plant-Derived Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor, etc. (everything short of rabbit-poop smart pills).

    Last time I checked quercitin was a carcinogen.

    You’ll find it listed as such in poison control/information books.

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    Most of the above products are either (1) GMO, (2) GMO-derived, (3) coal tar-derived, and/or (4) petroleum-derived.

    Better Living Through Toxic Chemistry.

    Reply

  3. August 1, 2019 @ 2:03 pm Lynn_M

    If a person usually went to bed around 12:30 am and got up 7-8 hours later, would that change their circadian rhythm timing from what is considered the normal? Would that have any impact on their optimal Solar Nutrition eating times?

    Reply

    • August 2, 2019 @ 5:30 am Atom

      It’s slightly less than optimum, but not enough to worry about.

      We often find ourselves in a similar situation.

      Breakfast is still optimum between 7:00-9:00 a.m. even when staying up till 3:00 or 4:00 in the morning.

      Our “food clock” and “social clock” can compensate for our “light clock” and “darkness clock.”

      All four are in different sections of the brain.

      Reply


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