Be Kind to Your Large Bowel

 

 

By Atom Bergstrom

Atom’s Blog

 

Re: Could you please name some foods that help strengthen / soothe / heal the large intestine?

Basically, the answer to your question involves a food’s digestibility (poisons excluded, of course).

For example, venison is more digestible than beef because it stays in the stomach for only an hour, while beef often takes four hours.

When the stomach isn’t up to par, the large intestine gets overworked.

Food should exit the stomach in a fluid or semi-fluid condition.

The vermiform appendix is a “second stomach,” and not a vestigial organ, as mainstream medical scientists now claim.

<>

The digestibility and the transit time are more important to the large intestine than specific foods.

Breakfast should be in the toilet by suppertime, lunch by breakfast time, and supper by lunchtime (for most people).

<>

Eggs are one of the best foods for the large intestines.

TIMESTAMP eggs by eating them at night. Circulation-Sex Time (7:00-9:00 p.m.) is ideal.

<>

Not only do eggs supply get-up-and-go, they also supply “satisfying power.”

Yes, junk food also supplies “satisfying power,” but self-observation can detect the difference.

No medical doctor can measure “satisfying power.” It’s independent of calories or milligrams.

<>

Avoid omega-3 enriched eggs.

Walk big circles around them.

DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and flaxseed (linseed) contribute to Yellow Fat Disease.

<>

Beware of processed dietary fiber.

Even a little can be too much.

Kay R. McPherson (“Fiber, stool bulk, and bile acid output: implications for colon cancer risk,” Preventive Medicine, Jul. 1987) wrote …

“Most types of fiber increase the total volume of stool and reduce the concentration of specific substances, including bile acids, that are in contact with the bowel wall. However, fibers differ in their effect on stool bulk, with wheat fiber being a more effective stool bulking agent than fruit and vegetable fibers. In addition, the extent to which a specific fiber reduces bile acid concentration will be modified by its concomitant effects on total fecal sterol excretion. Whereas wheat bran reduces fecal bile acid concentration, pectin, lignin, and oat bran do not. These three fibers significantly increase total bile acid output. Bile acids act as promoters of colonic tumors in mutagenesis assay systems and in various animal models.”
.
.



Missing Podcast?

If you see an error with an archived podcast or know that an episode of our show is missing, please press the button below to send us a message so we can look into it.

Enter your name and email if you want to be notified when this podcast is fixed:

'Be Kind to Your Large Bowel' have 11 comments

  1. January 7, 2018 @ 11:20 pm Atom

    Mandatory Evacuation again!

    Mudslides are coming to our neighborhood.

    At least we received advance notice this time.

    We’re taking our Rainbow vacuum cleaner with us.

    It’s already packed.

    The Adventure Continues!

    Reply

    • January 9, 2018 @ 10:04 am Patricia Valenzuela

      Who knows Atom,maybe its time to move back to Texas,I’m sure our buddy Patrick would really be keen on thatmay GOD bless you and vibrant gal for all rhat you do❤️❤️❤️

      Reply

      • January 9, 2018 @ 10:17 pm Atom

        Seems Natures definitely trying to get our attention about ~something~!

        Thanks, Patricia! :)

        Reply

  2. January 8, 2018 @ 7:55 am catalin voinea

    Thanks!
    I do love eggs for supper!

    Stay safe!

    Reply

    • January 9, 2018 @ 10:18 pm Atom

      We fried some eggs up last night! :)

      Reply

  3. January 8, 2018 @ 8:00 am catalin voinea

    With regards to the Law of similars – a little bit of turmeric / ginger (in powdered form) at supper time would help the colon?
    How about aloe vera juice and raw honey – are they soothing to the large bowel?

    I do recall reading in a past blog entry that Adano mentioned brown sesame seeds as being good for the colon. When should I consume my tahini to positive impact the colon?

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • January 9, 2018 @ 10:19 pm Atom

      All the things you mentioned are OK for the large intestine … but not necessarily soothing.

      Reply

      • January 10, 2018 @ 5:48 am catalin voinea

        Got it. Then what would u consider to be soothing for the large intestine? Thanks

        Reply

        • January 10, 2018 @ 11:34 am Atom

          White rice, clarified butter, slippery elm bark, summer squash, boiled egg, well-cooked taro root, etc.

          What about peppermint? Walk big circles around it.

          Reply

          • January 10, 2018 @ 8:43 pm James

            peppermint with regards to soothing large intestines or in general? Just curious since Tony P. recommends it as one of the things to use as estrogen blocking, besides his top pick of rosemary.

            At-OM: SEE REPLY BELOW.

  4. January 11, 2018 @ 12:33 am Atom

    On the other side of the coin, there are herbalists who claim peppermint is loaded with “libido-killing phytoestrogens,” leading to comments like the following in cyberspace …

    “Lowers testosterone and possibly fries testicles long term. Women use it to combat hirsutism.”

    <>

    Peppermint contains at least two ingredients that make me cautious.

    Pulegone is an insecticide and menthol is an out-and-out poison.

    Yes, many people cite the virtues of menthol, and it has its upsides.

    But an overdose is possible if too much is taken (and menthol exists in other herbs too).

    Herbal ingredients vary according to where and how they are grown and processed.

    <>

    Peppermint relaxes the cardiac valve (between the esophagus and stomach), so it’s a known cause of heartburn and GERD.

    Some herbalists advise taking peppermint in capsule form to avoid the cardiac valve, but, whatever I can’t chew, I avoid.

    The mouth, according to Swami Nitty-Gritty, is the “only atomic part of digestion.”

    <>

    And the following is anecdotal and personal, so feel free to ignore it …

    Even the odor of peppermint makes me nauseous.

    That’s why I personally walk big circles around it.

    <>

    One of my friends is a big fan of peppermint oil, using it all day, and he wound up with intestinal gangrene.

    Maybe it’s a coincidence.

    Correlation is not causation.

    <>

    There’s more to add, so I might expand this into a blog entry.

    Reply


Would you like to share your thoughts?

Your email address will not be published.

©Copyright One Radio Network 2014 • All rights reserved. Site built by RedLotus AustinThe information on this website and talk shows is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors, producers of One Radio Network, Patrick Timpone, their guests or web masters take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained on this website in written or audio form, live or podcasts. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider and take total responsibility for his or her actions at all times. Patrick Joseph of the family of Timpone, a man...All rights reserved, without recourse.