The Vegetarian Vampire

By Atom Bergstrom

Atom’s Blog

Iron is the most important metal in the cosmos.

Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are not metals.

Iron-56 is the only completely non-radioactive element in the cosmos.

(Nickel-56 is the exception to the rule, but it’s too sparse to make a difference.)

Iron-56 is the MID-POINT between fusion and fission …

The nuclear bomb is to the left of iron-56.

The atomic bomb is to the right of iron-56.

Iron is essential for life.

But can you get too much?

If you supplement with iron (wittingly or unwittingly), YES.

Let’s take the case of the Vegetarian Vampire.

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I managed a health food store in an Austin mall, when a guy walked by dressed like Tom Cruise in the movie Interview with a Vampire.

He saw me looking him over, so he approached me and said, “I am NOT a vampire.”

“That’s interesting,” I replied, “because your gray complexion indicates an iron overload.”

“Well, that can’t be because I’m a vegetarian.”

“You can get iron-overloaded on other foods, not just meat.”

“And what foods would those be?” he challenged.

“Canned black olives, for instance, especially the ones packed with iron fumerate,” I replied.

“Really? I eat two cans of black olives every day!”

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    'The Vegetarian Vampire' have 9 comments

    1. August 14, 2020 @ 5:40 pm Atom

      About 95% of the human body’s magnesium is recycled by healthy kidneys, mostly in the loop of Henle (60-70%).

      Most pharmaceutical drugs are detrimental to the kidneys, and “loop diuretics” are especially so.

      Examples of loop diuretics …

      1) furosemide (Lasix)

      2) bumetanide (Bumex)

      3) ethacrynic acid (Edyerin)

      4) torasemide (Demadex)

      5) azilsartan medoxomil (Edarbi)

      <>

      Being a Contrarian even among Constrarians, my e-book on MAGNESIUM takes a very alternative look at this controversial metal …

      Magnesium: The Good, The Bad, & The Valid (2019)
      $9.99(22 pages, 8 1/2″ x 11″, PDF; EPUB)

      ©2019 by Atom Bergstrom. All rights reserved.

      MAGNESIUM: THE GOOD, THE BAD, & THE VALID does not praise the magnificence of magnesium. I’m not anti-magnesium either. Magnesium is an essential atomic element, indispensable for our high-level wellness and longevity, so I’d be a fool to badmouth it. As usual, the Contrarian Even Among Contrarians (yours truly) has written a treatise containing controversial and little-known facts about a subject, in this case, magnesium. You’ll learn why magnesium’s CONTEXT is crucial, something totally ignored by other authors (except Dr. Emanuel Revici, Mr. Adano Ley, and very few others). This publication is the first in a series of 21st Century “Alchemy” treatises. I wrote a dozen or so back in the 1990s (Boron, Lithium, Calcium, etc.), including this one, and all of them were in need of updating and major revising (more work than I’d anticipated). So here’s the original work, re-titled, revised, and updated. Enjoy!
      http://www.solartiming.com/store–mini-e-books.php#magnesium

      Reply

    2. August 14, 2020 @ 5:45 pm Atom

      Lobsters come in a variety of colors — yellow, orange, greenish-brown, mottled, white, and blue.

      Iridescent blue and white are the rarest.

      Cooking denatures the coloring proteins, exposing astaxanthin, the typical red pigment of a cooked lobster.

      But lobster blood stays blue, due to the copper at the center of its cuproglobin molecule.

      Reply

    3. August 14, 2020 @ 5:47 pm Atom

      If you want iron OUT of your body, don’t eat iron foods with vitamin C.

      Combined, they increase IRON — the opposite if you minimize iron foods.

      People get in SERIOUS trouble by not knowing this basic nutritional fact.

      Reply

      • September 9, 2020 @ 11:56 pm marc

        Atom do you consider potatoes a vitamin C rich food? I’m thinking about meat and potatoes over here. Is that a bad combo? The timing is off for them together I’m thinking.

        Reply

        • September 10, 2020 @ 10:03 pm Atom

          Rabbit meat or fish (dry fish have less omega 3 fatty acids if you avoid the liver) go with potatoes in the evening.

          Allegedly, one medium-size potato provides about 20% of the Minimum Daily Requirement, but Ray Peat claims much more because only the ascorbic acid is being measured, not the more potent dehydroascorbic acid.

          Reply

    4. August 14, 2020 @ 5:48 pm Atom

      Vitamin C is a “wastepaper basket” term for dozens of different chemicals.

      Several of them are now used to “neutralize” chlorine.

      Vitamin C is CHELATED IRON (uh oh!).

      Reply

    5. August 14, 2020 @ 5:48 pm Atom

      Copper strengthens muscles, hence, people “think” it helps arthritis.

      Reply

    6. August 14, 2020 @ 5:50 pm Atom

      Emanuel Revici explains copper metabolism better than anyone.

      The trouble starts when it escapes the Fourth Period of the Periodic Table.

      Reply

    7. August 14, 2020 @ 5:50 pm Atom

      Insert a magnesium atom in the middle of hemoglobin, and purple porphyrin turns green and becomes magnesium porphyrin, otherwise known as CHLOROPHYLL. Magnesium is one of iron’s Balance Minerals.

      Insert a copper atom in the middle of hemoglobin, and purple porphyrin turns blue and becomes copper porphyrin, a copper-centered hemoglobin found in certain marine animals, e.g. CRABS and LOBSTERS. Copper is another one of iron’s Balance Minerals.

      Reply


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