Xylitol Is Only a Minor Poison

 

 

By Atom Bergstrom

Atom’s Blog

Re: What have you got against xylitol?

I’d be more enthusiastic about xylitol if my name was Terry Termite.

<>

Xylitol is only a minor poison, a mere blip on the radar screen when it comes to that dastardly trio of DHA, EPA, and ALA.

But I’m just not that keen about corporate beaker boys employed by the lumber industry disposing of their wood scraps by chemically transmuting them into money-spinning pseudo-food and supplements.

It’s called “turning waste biomass into revenue streams.”

It’s also called “added value,” sometimes referred to as squeezing that last oink out of the pig.

The beaker boys emphasize the “added value” to their masters, the bureaucrats, but the gullible public is told that turning forest waste into bioproducts is all about reducing carbon dioxide to curb global warming.

Roll up your pants! It’s too late to save your Birkenstocks!

<>

The cyclonic brain-fart (scatterbrained idea) of converting wood scraps into food, booze, sugar, and drugs was hatched during the mid-1930s, a few years before the onset of the Second World War.

Both Germany and the U.S. knew there were going to be food and drug shortages once the war began, so Better Eating Through Chemistry got a synthetic B-12 shot in the bum.

Today’s pine bark bread and birch sap drink are only the snowflake on the tip of the iceberg.

<>

Did you know you’re already eating meat and dessert products made of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), courtesy of the lumber industry?

Wake up and smell the pine sap, potheads!

The lumber barons already took away your hemp a hundred years ago, but you never noticed that they’re rapidly taking away your food.

I prefer growing my food in a garden instead of having it (food, booze, sugar, and drugs) chemically transmuted out of wood scraps.

<>

Why does the timber industry want to sell us xylitol?

Maybe it’s because of the various PATENTS OWNED to manufacture it, for example …

Patent US8283139
Patent US5081026
Patent US4008285
Patent US3980719
Patent US7598374
Patent US8921082

That’s just some of the U.S. patents, with many other patents held by other countries, including China, Russia, Finland, etc.

<>

Long story short, I give the cold shoulder to xylitol because I’m not interested in helping the fat cats turn their waste streams into revenue streams or helping to curb global warming.

The natural glucose and fructose in my tomatoes don’t have patent numbers.
.
.



Missing Podcast?

If you see an error with an archived podcast or know that an episode of our show is missing, please press the button below to send us a message so we can look into it.

Enter your name and email if you want to be notified when this podcast is fixed:

'Xylitol Is Only a Minor Poison' have 5 comments

  1. September 9, 2017 @ 2:39 am Atom

    Xylitol and xylose over-hydrate other anatomical locations besides the intestines. For example, the lens of the eye.

    K.N. Sulochana, S. Ramakrishnan, S.B. Vasanthi, H.N. Madhavan, K. Arunagiri, & R. Punitham (“First report of congenital or infantile cataract in deranged proteoglycan metabolism with released xylose,” The British Journal of Ophthalmology, Apr. 1997) wrote …

    “Of 220 children of both sexes below 12 years of age, with congenital or infantile cataract treated in Sankara Nethralaya, Madras, India, during a period of 2 years, 145 excreted fragments of GAG (heparan and chondroitin sulphates) in their urine. There was no such excretion among the control group of 50 children. The same was found accumulated in the blood and lenses of affected children. In addition, xylose was present in small amounts in the urine and blood and xylitol was present in the lens. There was a significant elevation in the activity of beta glucuronidase in lymphocytes and urine, when compared with normals. All the above findings suggest deranged proteoglycan metabolism. As the urine contained mostly GAG fragments and very little xylose, Benedict’s reagent was not reduced. This ruled out galactosaemia. CONCLUSION: An increase of beta glucuronidase activity might have caused extensive fragmentation of GAG with resultant accumulation in the blood and lens and excretion in urine. Small amounts of xylose may have come from xylose links between GAG and core protein of proteoglycans. Owing to their polyanionic nature, GAG fragments in the lens might abstract sodium, and with it water, thereby increasing the hydration of the lens. Excessive hydration and the osmotic effect of xylitol from xylose might cause cataract. While corneal clouding has been reported in inborn acid mucopolysaccharidosis, congenital or infantile cataract with deranged metabolism of proteoglycans (acid mucopolysaccharide-xylose-protein complex) is reported in children for the first time.”

    http://solartiming.com/media–videos-by-atom.php

    Reply

    • September 12, 2017 @ 4:16 pm John

      Hello Atom! Are there other, natural means a person with tartar (or calculus) can remove it from their teeth besides having to physically scrape it off? I have read that there is research being done into using Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) and Near-Infrared (NIR) lasers to remove sub-gingival calculus…does this mean red light therapy might be of assistance in this matter?

      How did humans over a thousand years ago maintain healthy teeth and avoid cavities, or any disease of the teeth and gums?

      Are there any concerns with the use of stabilized chlorine dioxide or Trisodium Phosphate (TSP) as part of a program to maintain or restore dental health?

      Reply

  2. September 10, 2017 @ 12:20 am Christopher

    What about Turpentine, and pine sap?

    Reply

    • October 16, 2017 @ 3:10 pm Atom

      As long as they’re unprocessed, no problem.

      Pine sap or turpentine taken right from the tree are natural whole products.

      Xylitol and high-fructose corn syrup are not only processed and GMO — they’re overly processed.

      Reply

  3. September 14, 2017 @ 8:36 am Atom

    Re: Are there other, natural means a person with tartar (or calculus) can remove it from their teeth besides having to physically scrape it off? I have read that there is research being done into using Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) and Near-Infrared (NIR) lasers to remove sub-gingival calculus…does this mean red light therapy might be of assistance in this matter?

    Lasers are almost as aggressive as scraping. Red light therapy won’t work for calculus. (What red light therapy does work for is in my latest e-mini-book, Red Light & Longevity.)

    http://solartiming.com/store–mini-e-books.php#Red-Light

    <>

    Re: How did humans over a thousand years ago maintain healthy teeth and avoid cavities, or any disease of the teeth and gums?

    They had almost no access to PUFAs, HUFAs, and foods high in estrogen, nitric oxide, serotonin, and iron. Those who did paid the price, as forensic paleontologists have discovered.

    Re: Are there any concerns with the use of stabilized chlorine dioxide or Trisodium Phosphate (TSP) as part of a program to maintain or restore dental health?

    They’re both chemotherapy for the gums and teeth. Allopathic medicine often backfires and makes things worse.

    Our highest choice is to achieve a healthy oral ecology by eating foods (On Time is best) that build immunity (super-immunity is best) and keep the peace in the microbiome (bacteriome, virome, mycobiome).

    Reply


Would you like to share your thoughts?

Your email address will not be published.

©Copyright One Radio Network 2014 • All rights reserved. Site built by RedLotus AustinThe information on this website and talk shows is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors, producers of One Radio Network, Patrick Timpone, their guests or web masters take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained on this website in written or audio form, live or podcasts. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider and take total responsibility for his or her actions at all times. Patrick Joseph of the family of Timpone, a man...All rights reserved, without recourse.