Too Much Of a Good Thing

 

 

 

By Atom Bergstrom

Atom’s Blog

Adano Ley (Swami Nitty-Gritty) leaned back in his therapy-room chair, and told me …

“Thank God for pizza eaters and joggers. They keep us reflex therapists in business.”

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Doug McGuff, M.D., & John Little (Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week, 2009) wrote …

“Studies have documented that 60 percent of runners are injured in an average year, with one running injury occurring for every one hundred hours of performance.

“The damage caused by running will often manifest after a period of fifteen to twenty years of performing the activity, such as when runners who started in early adulthood reach the age of forty or fifty and find that they are no longer able to climb a flight of stairs without their knees aching; or they experience difficulty in lifting their arms above their head level because of osteophytes (bone spurs) that have formed in the shoulder joint; or they can’t turn or bend anymore because of chronic lower-back pain. These are progressive conditions, rather than immediate ones, and are consequences of inappropriate activities and activity levels that are chronically catabolic and are performed far too frequently to allow an anabolic state to manifest.”

According to the same source …

“The scientific literature is filled with data that strongly make the case that long-distance runners are much more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, cancer, liver and gallbladder disorders, muscle damage, kidney dysfunction (renal abnormalities), acute microthrombosis in the vascular system, brain damage, spinal degeneration, and germ-cell cancers than are their less active counterparts.”

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According to Adano …

“Any exercise requiring repetition plus torque can precipitate disease by muscle striation, leading to a mineral imbalance.”

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That’s not to say you should be a total couch potato or couch tomato.

Adano was in favor of explosive short-distance running …

“Sprinting is good for your kidneys. Run like someone’s chasing you.”

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There are always exceptions to the rule — like Fauja Singh — when it comes to marathon running.

Check him out on YouTube.

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According to “Turbaned Tornado: 104-year-old runner Fauja Singh is India’s pride,” Nov. 23, 2015 …

“At an unimaginable age of 100, Fauja Singh has world records of running various marathons.”

But, as far as I know, he doesn’t indulge in pizza.
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    'Too Much Of a Good Thing' have 5 comments

    1. June 25, 2017 @ 10:37 am Atom

      Terry Burnham & Jay Phelan (Mean Genes, 2000) wrote …

      “When mice are placed on tiny treadmills, many of them will simply go on strike. They will even sit on the moving belt to the point that the skin on their butts begins to get scratched and scraped. The mice are ingenious in their ability to avoid exercise, positioning themselves against walls, splaying their feet at extreme angles — anything to avoid jogging. Any one of us who has made elaborate excuses to escape a workout can empathize.”

      http://solartiming.com/store–e-books.php

      Reply

    2. June 25, 2017 @ 10:39 am Atom

      Re: Remember to stretch before and after every exercise session.

      Yes, No, Maybe.

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      Mike Mentzer (Muscles in Minutes) wrote …

      “Make sure that you spend some time warming the muscles to be worked. However, it is not necessary to stretch the muscles, perform aerobic work, or engage in any more exercise than is minimally required to limber up and increase the blood flow to the specific muscles you’re working that day.”

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      Dave Sears (“Stretching and Warm-Ups,” 2003) wrote …

      “If stretching and warm-ups do not prevent soreness and injuries (as we’ve all been told for so many years), what other ‘common knowledge’ should we challenge?”

      https://www.sunsyncnutrition.com/

      Reply

    3. June 25, 2017 @ 11:48 am Atom

      Re: When you advise minimizing pineapple, is it only in regard to eliminating rancid fats or do you mean generally? Could you expand on what the high serotonin is doing?

      Actually, the only way pineapple might be limited is by …

      1) eating it in the evening (Growth Zone 3)

      2) eating it in combination with other evening foods (not alone)

      I’m referring to ALL polyunsaturated fatty acids and highly unsaturated fatty acids, including the ones sharing space with the saturated ones in butter, coconut oil, palm oil, olive oil, etc.

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      I’ve been aware that serotonin was a “bad actor” since the late 1970s because of comments Swami Nitty-Gritty made about the pitfalls of the parasympathetic nervous system.

      Thanks to the accumulated evidence — including the murder and mayhem caused by monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) — the truth is finally emerging.

      Serotonin was important to the U.S. government’s “War on Drugs” because LSD is a potent serotonin inhibitor.

      Serotonin is a pro-stress agent that fuels aggression and suicide.

      It — in the form of Luvux — played a part in the Columbine shooting and many other related incidents — Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft.

      Serotonin also causes learning and creativity impairment.

      But the BIGGEST LIE the pharmaceutical cartels have been feeding us concern …

      1) neurotransmitters

      2) receptors

      They don’t even EXIST.

      Brain transmitters and receptors are MARKETING FICTIONS designed to sell billions of dollars of drugs to a gullible public.

      Charles Manson is imprisoned for life for ordering the death of seven people, while Big Pharma CEOs knowingly order the deaths of millions and laugh all the way to the bank.

      Wikipedia merely examines the snowflake on the surface of the iceberg …

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serotonin_syndrome

      Reply

    4. June 26, 2017 @ 7:29 pm Christopher

      I think those Italians are on to something. You don’t see many fat Italians. Its the cooked tomato in the mid-day aint it. Deliciousness. Like a fresh Montreal poutine deliciousness, only from Italy…or maybe the local home cooked Italian restaurant. Are the European peoples eating in time without knowing it?

      Reply

      • June 29, 2017 @ 7:44 pm Atom

        Longevity diets tend to follow circadian rhythms.

        Usually, it’s for intuitional and/or traditional reasons, but sometimes cultures know WHY. :)

        Reply


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